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What are the side effects of advantage for cats

Advantage is a veterinary-only injectable vaccine, so side effects are rare. Studies have shown that Advantage can be safely given to cats who have not been vaccinated for feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR). As with any injectable vaccine, Advantage may cause adverse effects in 1 out of 10 cats (10%). These adverse effects include swelling, redness, and excessive bleeding. Bleeding may lead to anemia and may cause weakness, lethargy and anorexia.

How does Advantage compare to other vaccines?

Advantage has been shown to be as effective as or more effective than other vaccines for preventing feline viral rhinotracheitis. For example, one study found that 3 doses of FVRCP vaccine given at two month intervals produced a 90% efficacy rate (i.e., the animals that were vaccinated were 90% less likely to develop FVR infection over 3 years of followup than those that were not vaccinated). A second study found that 1 dose of FVRCP vaccine given at two month intervals produced an 83% efficacy rate (i.e., the animals that were vaccinated were 83% less likely to develop FVR infection over 3 years of followup than those that were not vaccinated). A third study found that 3 doses of FVRCP vaccine given at three month intervals produced a 96% efficacy rate (i.e., the animals that were vaccinated were 96% less likely to develop FVR infection over 3 years of followup than those that were not vaccinated).

The efficacy of Advantage is similar to that of FVRCP.

How effective is Advantage for preventing FVR?

In a prospective, controlled study, researchers found that 3 doses of FVRCP given at three month intervals produced a 96% efficacy rate (i.e., the animals that were vaccinated were 96% less likely to develop FVR infection over 3 years of followup than those that were not vaccinated).

In a prospective, controlled study, researchers found that 3 doses of FVRCP given at two month intervals produced a 90% efficacy rate (i.e., the animals that were vaccinated were 90% less likely to develop FVR infection over 3 years of followup than those that were not vaccinated).

In a prospective, controlled study, researchers found that 1 dose of FVRCP given at two month intervals produced an 83% efficacy rate (i.e., the animals that were vaccinated were 83% less likely to develop FVR infection over 3 years of followup than those that were not vaccinated).

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