All about cats

What is a normal weight for a cat

A normal weight for a cat depends on several different factors, and it is constantly changing as your cat ages. A normal weight for a cat is different for all cats, depending on the breed, their age, and the environment in which they live.

Straight from the Source:

The Average Weight of a Cat

Percent of Body Weight to Be Considered "Overweight," "Normal," and "Underweight":

At one point or another, every cat owner has experienced the same thing: "My cat has put on a few pounds." It's a pretty common occurrence, and it's easy to see why.

What's the average weight a cat should be, anyway?

Well, if there's a problem with your cat's weight, it's a good idea to consult a vet before making any changes in your cat's diet, exercise routine, or lifestyle.

A cat's ideal weight is an individualized matter, depending on a variety of factors.

The average weight of a cat is going to vary from cat to cat, depending on the breed, their age, and the environment in which they live.

In general, however, the average weight of a cat is:

Underweight: less than 4 pounds

Normal: 4 to 8 pounds

Overweight: 8 to 12 pounds

Obese: greater than 12 pounds

The average weight of a cat is also going to change a lot during the course of a year, depending on the season.

In the winter, the average weight of a cat is going to be less than in the summer.

In the spring and summer, the average weight of a cat is going to be greater than in the winter.

The average weight of a cat is also going to change during their lifetime.

A cat's weight is going to fluctuate a lot during their lifetimes, depending on the cat's environment and lifestyle.

The average weight of a cat is also going to change if they're sick, have a medical condition, or are pregnant.

How Much Is Too Much?

It's often difficult to say what exactly is considered to be an "overweight" cat.

Your veterinarian can provide you with information about your cat's weight, and discuss with you how you can manage your cat's weight.

Your vet may also prescribe a diet that is designed to help your cat lose weight, or provide other solutions to help your cat maintain a healthy weight.

"Overweight" is a relative term.

The term "overweight" is often used to describe how much a cat weighs compared to other cats.

To make things even more confusing, the term "overweight" is also often used to refer to a cat's body condition score, or BCS.

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