All about cats

What are the signs my cat is dying

Your cat is dying. The signs are a clear and obvious: Your cat is not eating, is having trouble breathing, is not moving, is rolling over in discomfort, is not drinking water, is losing weight, is not acting like your cat normally does, is having trouble peeing, is not using the litter box, is not acting like your cat normally does, is sneezing, has a runny nose and is obviously not feeling well.

How do I know my cat has cancer?

When your cat is sick, the vet will do a physical exam and ask you questions about the cat's symptoms. After the exam, the vet may do a blood test to check for cancer. Although the exam is generally sufficient for a diagnosis, some vets will do a blood test to check for cancer. Ask your vet!

What is the best treatment for my cat?

The best treatment for cancer is chemotherapy. There is no cure for cancer and treatment is usually aimed at prolonging your cat's quality of life.

What are the possible side effects of treatment?

Side effects of treatment include vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, vomiting, liver damage, hair loss, nausea and fatigue.

What should I do if I can't afford treatment?

Your cat is probably not going to survive long enough for you to save up the money to pay for treatment. If your cat's quality of life is very poor, try to make an appointment with a low-cost clinic or vet that may be able to help you.

How long will my cat need chemotherapy?

Depending on the type of cancer and type of treatment, your cat may live a few weeks or a few months.

What is hospice?

Hospice is a type of end-of-life care for cats. It's a program that helps cats with cancer and other life-limiting illnesses stay at home and enjoy a more comfortable and dignified life. Hospice is voluntary and provides information and support for families in the last months of their cat's life.

What is home care?

Home care is a type of end-of-life care for cats. It's a program that helps cats with cancer and other life-limiting illnesses stay at home and enjoy a more comfortable and dignified life. Home care is voluntary and provides information and support for families in the last months of their cat's life.

Why should I try to keep my cat with me?

Because it's the right thing to do. When your cat is sick, he is not a burden. He is your best friend. Your cat can't understand how much you love him, but you can.

Where can I find more information?

Visit the ASPCA's website at www.aspca.

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