All about cats

What should cats eat with kidney disease

Cats with kidney disease need to eat a diet that has adequate levels of protein and phosphorus. Cats with kidney disease should also have adequate levels of potassium and calcium. Feeding cats a diet with insufficient amounts of protein and phosphorous can lead to further impairment of kidney function.

Kittens with kidney disease should be fed a diet that has adequate levels of protein and phosphorus.

Cats with kidney disease should be fed a diet that has adequate levels of potassium and calcium.

How can I tell if my cat has kidney disease?

You can tell if your cat has kidney disease by checking its urinary output. Specifically, you should check your cat's urine output every day. Urine output is easy to do: all you have to do is find a clean, dry place in the house, such as a bathroom or a closet, and cat litter box. Place your cat in the litter box and urinate into the litter. If you observe any increase in the amount of urine your cat produces, this is an indication of kidney disease.

What are the symptoms of kidney disease?

The most common symptom of kidney disease in cats is loss of appetite. Cats with kidney disease often lose their appetite and become listless. These changes in appetite are often seen in cats that are in the late stages of kidney disease.

Another symptom of kidney disease is vomiting. Some cats with kidney disease will vomit. Vomiting is most often seen in cats that are in the late stages of kidney disease.

Another symptom of kidney disease is lethargy. Cats with kidney disease often become lethargic and may appear depressed.

Another symptom of kidney disease is polydipsia (excessive drinking). Cats with kidney disease may drink excessively, often gulping down water in a short period of time.

What are the complications of kidney disease?

If kidney disease progresses, it can cause many problems for cats. In advanced stages of kidney disease, cats may become so weak that they can't stand and can't walk, may have difficulty breathing and may develop anemia.

Cats with advanced kidney disease may also develop a condition known as swollen feet. This is a condition in which the blood pressure in the cat's legs gets very high and the veins in the feet swell. The feet may appear swollen and may become very painful.

See more

The prognosis for kidney disease is quite variable depending on response to the initial stage of treatment and your ability to perform the follow-up care. We encourage treatment in most situations because many cats will respond and maintain a good quality of life for up to four years. Read more

Learning your cat has kidney disease (also called kidney failure) can be alarming. After all, the kidneys are a major organ. The good news is that symptoms are often treatable, meaning it’s possible for a cat with kidney disease to still live a long, happy life. Read more

Male Cat Health. Male cats, especially neutered ones, are more likely to suffer from urinary tract infections. They can also suffer from something called ‘stud tail’ – the technical term for this is feline tail gland hyperplasia. Read more

When chronic kidney disease progresses to the end stage, kidney replacement therapy (dialysis or kidney transplantation) or conservative kidney management (planned, holistic, patient centred care for those with stage 5 chronic kidney disease) is required.1 2 3 4 Extensive study has been made of the costs and consequences of kidney disease—from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease to end stage. Read more

Leave your comment

Name
Comment