All about cats

What age should my cat be neutered

Neutering your cat is an important part of animal welfare and public health. Neutered males are less likely to roam, fight and spray urine and feces. Neutering does not reduce your cat's natural instincts. In fact, neutering will have no effect on your cat's sexual behaviour.

At just 5 months old, your cat should go to the vet for neutering. Neutering is recommended for males between 4 months and 3 years of age. Females can be spayed at any age.

Neutering your cat will not increase his chances of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). There is no way to know if your cat is infected with an STI before neutering.

Neutering a male cat helps to control his roaming and fighting behaviour. It also reduces the incidence of spraying (urine marking) and the development of a 'scent mark'. Your cat can still be affectionate and even show aggression towards people (play-fighting). But he won't kill anything or spray urine and feces. Neutered cats may even become more affectionate.

Neutering will have no effect on your cat's sexual behaviour.

Neutering is recommended for males between 4 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering is recommended for females between 6 months and 3 years of age.

When should my cat be neutered?

Females should be spayed at about six months of age. Males should be neutered between 4 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering a female at about 5 months of age is recommended for females between 6 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering a female at about 6 months of age is recommended for females between 8 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering a female at about 8 months of age is recommended for females between 10 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering a female at about 10 months of age is recommended for females between 12 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering a female at about 12 months of age is recommended for females between 14 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering a female at about 14 months of age is recommended for females between 16 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering a female at about 16 months of age is recommended for females between 18 months and 3 years of age.

Neutering a female at about 18 months of age is recommended for females between 20 months and 3 years of age.

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Feline spaying (cat spay procedure) - otherwise known as spaying cats, female neutering, sterilisation, "fixing", desexing, ovary and uterine ablation, uterus removal or by the medical term: ovariohysterectomy - is the surgical removal of a female cat's ovaries and uterus for the purposes of feline population control, medical health benefit, genetic-disease control and behavioral modification. Read more

Is the early procedure more dangerous than the standard procedure? Does it affect behavior? Our local veterinarians do not neuter until the animal is approximately 7 months old. Does the early procedure require additional training? What is the youngest age at which you recommend spaying or neutering? Read more

Aside from unwanted pregnancies, spaying a female cat also helps prevent: Womb, ovarian and mammary cancers. Pyometra, a life-threatening womb infection. Very loud attempts to attract a mate, which can sound like she’s in pain or very distressed. The equally vocal and persistent attentions of uncastrated tomcats. The stress, restlessness, and hormonal mood changes that come when a cat is in heat – increased aggression, for example. Straying away from home in her search for a mate. FIV, the feline version of HIV, which can be spread through bites inflicted during mating. Read more

An un-spayed female cat will go into heat, meaning she's ready to mate, every three to four weeks.[1] X Research source <i>Reproduction in the Dog and Cat. Christianseen. Publisher: Baillierie-Tindal</i> Usually, this involves howls, screeches, writhing, and attempts to attract or run away with male cats.[2] X Research source Calming the cat down is hard, and more importantly, it's only temporary. This is natural, normal behavior for a cat in heat, no matter how annoying it is to owners. If it's too much to handle, seek a long-term solution instead of a quick fix. Read more

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