All about cats

What does it mean when your cat licks you

If you've noticed your cat licking you, you might be wondering if he or she is trying to lick the poison off your skin or if the animal actually likes you.

In order to find out the answer to this question, you should consider some of the most common reasons why a cat licks, as well as the reasons why cats lick themselves.

Why Does My Cat Lick Me?

Cats lick and groom for a variety of reasons, but many of them have to do with hygiene.

"Cats lick for hygiene," explains Dr. Katherine Houpt, associate professor and director of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine's Feline Behavior Clinic. "Cats are natural groomers. They need to keep themselves clean. They have to have very good oral hygiene."

Cats lick their faces for a variety of reasons. They do this to help them keep their whiskers clean, which is another sign of their oral hygiene.

Cats also do this because they're trying to keep their whiskers from getting too long. According to Dr. Houpt, "Cats that have very long whiskers are more likely to get into fights or to be aggressive because they can't see their opponent very well."

Finally, cats lick themselves to help them get the scent of another cat off their body so they don't smell like another cat.

"Cats like to keep scent off their fur," says Houpt.

Why Does My Cat Lick Themselves?

Many cats lick themselves for a variety of reasons.

"Cats lick for a variety of reasons," explains Dr. Houpt. "Cats lick themselves to help them get rid of urine, to get rid of odor from the hair itself, or to get rid of the dead hair on their bodies. Cats lick themselves because they're bored."

Cats also lick themselves because they're trying to get scent off their bodies.

"Cats lick themselves because they're trying to get scent off their bodies," explains Houpt.

"If the cat is licking itself, it's trying to get scent off itself. It's trying to get the scent of another cat off its fur. If it licks itself, it's trying to get scent off its fur."

Why Does My Cat Lick Its Paws?

It's important to keep in mind that not all cats lick their paws. "Some cats don't lick their paws, and some do," explains Dr. Houpt. "Some cats lick their paws because they're trying to get scent off their paws."

Why Does My Cat Lick the Walls?

Some cats lick the walls because they're bored. "Some cats like to lick the walls. Some cats like to lick the door. Cats lick the walls because they're bored," explains Dr. Houpt.

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