All about cats

What are common cat illnesses

The most common causes of feline illnesses are:

Cat bites

Cat fleas

Feline leukemia (FeLV)

Feline distemper (FIV)

Fungal infections

Nutritional imbalances

Parasitic infestation

If your cat is ill, you will notice that it has a decreased appetite, may vomit and/or has diarrhoea.

As a cat owner, you will want to provide your cat with quality cat food to keep it healthy and prevent an illness.

How do I know if my cat needs a prescription diet?

Your veterinarian will ask you questions to determine if your cat needs a prescription diet.

Your veterinarian will ask you questions to determine if your cat needs a prescription diet. If the answer is yes, your vet will provide you with a prescription diet for your cat.

What is the difference between prescription and over the counter cat diets?

You should talk to your veterinarian about the best cat food for your cat.

Prescription cat diets are used for acute and chronic illnesses. These diets are designed for cats who are suffering from an acute illness (such as diarrhoea or vomiting) or a chronic illness (such as diabetes, distemper and FIV).

Generally, prescription diets contain more nutrients than an over the counter cat food diet.

Over the counter cat diets are available at grocery stores and pet stores.

The main difference between over the counter cat foods and prescription cat foods is that the ingredients used in over the counter cat foods are not regulated by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association.

The Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) has set guidelines for prescription cat foods.

The main difference between over the counter cat foods and prescription cat foods is that the ingredients used in over the counter cat foods are not regulated by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association. When diet is prescribed, your cat is given the best food for its health and diet.

What is the difference between prescription and over the counter cat foods?

Over the counter cat foods are available at grocery stores and pet stores.

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