All about cats

What is a cat's normal heart rate

A cat's normal heart rate is between 60 and 80 beats per minute, or bpm.

What is the difference between feline cardiomyopathy and feline heart disease?

The terms feline cardiomyopathy and feline heart disease are used interchangeably. The main difference between the two is that feline cardiomyopathy is a form of heart disease that is seen more in cats that have had a history of heart disease. In feline heart disease, there is no history of heart disease and the cat has a normal heart rate.

What are some symptoms of feline cardiomyopathy?

The symptoms of feline cardiomyopathy can include one or more of the following:

Lethargy

Shortness of breath

Dilated, pale-blue, or cyanotic pupils

Treatment

Treatment options for feline heart disease may include one or more of the following:

Medication: Oral medications such as digoxin or flea medications have been used to help control feline heart disease.

Oral medications such as digoxin or flea medications have been used to help control feline heart disease. Surgery: If the feline's heart rate is faster than normal, surgery may be needed to place a pacemaker.

If the feline's heart rate is faster than normal, surgery may be needed to place a pacemaker. Tube: A cat with feline cardiomyopathy may need a tube placed in its chest to drain fluid from the lungs.

How is feline heart disease diagnosed?

The diagnosis of feline heart disease is based on the following:

Physical exam

Blood tests: Blood tests can reveal anemia and other signs of heart disease.

Blood tests can reveal anemia and other signs of heart disease. Echocardiogram: This test uses sound waves and a computer to create an image of the heart.

This test uses sound waves and a computer to create an image of the heart. Catheterization: In some cases, a catheter may be placed into the chest to remove fluid from the lungs and to check the heart's function.

How is feline cardiomyopathy treated?

Treatment for feline cardiomyopathy may include one or more of the following:

Medication: Oral medications such as digoxin and flea medications have been used to help control feline heart disease.

Oral medications such as digoxin and flea medications have been used to help control feline heart disease. Surgery: If the cat's heart rate is faster than normal, surgery may be needed to place a pacemaker.

If the cat's heart rate is faster than normal, surgery may be needed to place a pacemaker.

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